click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130115
20130123
SHOW
Book TV 28
Cavuto 12
Today 12
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 172
SFGTV 160
MSNBCW 88
CSPAN2 64
CNNW 58
FBC 54
CSPAN 49
MSNBC 39
CNN 29
KPIX (CBS) 28
KQED (PBS) 28
KGO (ABC) 25
FOXNEWS 23
CURRENT 22
KTVU (FOX) 22
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1149
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,149 (some duplicates have been removed)
fighting terrorism with education i've learned from islamic scholars. in the koran it's implicitly stated in the holy koran when a young mangos on jiha d and this is a spiritual endeavor to seek knowledge. it could also mean he's going into a group. but he has to get blessings from his mother first and if he doesn't do that it's shameful and disgraceful. after 911 the taliban had a high desertion rate and they were trying to get recruit groups to fight against intervention and coalition and they went in literally impoverished societies because educated women refused to allow they're sons to fight in theal bonn. you have a less educated mother here. single parent in the difficult system. the higher education a women has the more likely her son is to go on with education rather than getting into violence and drugs and certainly she won't condone her son getting into a gang or drugs. i've sometimes been criticized for that because they say all the 911 hijackers were educated and had university degrees and that certainly is true. but nobody botherd to check they're mothers and nearly
educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
that we have a lot of educating to do. in my office we do a lot of cyber bullying training in our schools and it's amazing how much access some kids have to the internet at a really young age. they have iphones. they're on the internet. they have or smartphones. they have computers in the bedroom and parent it is never over the shoulder to see what is going online. there is a lot of unrestricted access to the internet and the internet has put it on another level and one push of a button and everybody in the school will have a picture or hear it and the outcome of that is -- it would be not just reconciling relationships or restorative justice or some other way between two or three or four people but now you have a whole study body that has been tempered or tainted with something that goes against the individual who was a target of that, so the internet working more strongly with the partners and the providers of the internet and there is awareness and education, but back to the student assemblies that we do it is amazing at the end of the assemblies how many kids will step forward qu
with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. first of all only 12 percent of nonfiction books make a profit and 2/3 are pre chosen by the publisher. we'd like to put our marketing arm behind us but your having to fight tear riz m to this. since i grew up in africa and worked pakistan for many years you never settle a deal without driving a hard bargain so i said if the hard cover doesn't do well, i'd like the subtitle changed later on for the paper back. julia and our other board relently pounded away month after month. i was in pakistan of december of 2006 and there was a new editor on the book and they said they decided to change the title to one man's mission to
serious education marketing campaign. we've got to educate everybody using our streets. so, we're choosing today in the middle of the beginning of our holiday season with everybody's attention on having great fun, having wonderful events, having serious sales that allow people to shop, this is where the consciousness has to be risen. and, so, in light of this, we picked this day and this time and this area of year to make this announcement that we have a pedestrian strategy that's going on, a serious one. we're jointly doing it with the collaboration of all the different departments. we have asked and part of the strategy will be our police department, really doing a lot more enforcement strategically in all the areas that we need to, with not only stops, not only enforcement and ticketing, but a serious effort to remind people that these are going to be spots where we are going to pay a lot more attention. we have the mta, with ed's leadership and his staff, parking and traffic and others, working to do some of the physical improvements that remind everybody that we emphasize pedestrian u
, commissioner wynn. >> i wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by
heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
comfortable and i will tell you across race, across class -- maybe that's the way they do it. as an educator, can i? and as a responsibility we have to get power and empowering adults what they can do and the responsibilities are and to name discrete actions and this is bullying and this isn't and it's a much bigger frame about children and adults being safe and being fully present and we're are taking that on as a system and until that time we have done that i don't think we're going to see the real outcomes that we need that are focused ready to engage in communities the way that we need to. i can't give you this is bullying. this isn't. we're making progress in able to talk about it. >> richard. >> i agree everything tony said and as a teacher and administrator and i have children in the san francisco public schools to and this is about the power relationship that one individual has over another individual and the district attorney spoke about sometimes adults are part of the issue where an adult that holds the ability to give you a grade for example and you're a senior and you need
a community center in the western addition and we talk about educating and supporting and one of the things that comes it my mind off the top is really talking to the people that are doing the bullying and understanding hurt people hurt people, right? as we're talking about this, there are two pieces and i'm wondering how do you integrate, we all talk about the finances and making things happen, but one is the mental health piece, the part about understanding where it's coming from, talking about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a o
or don't know what to bring to the hearing process. we use it as an opportunity to educate the public even when i'm a rule against them i try to give them an explanation about why i have reached that conclusion and what they might do to obtain assistance. i know the last hearing there was a woman who spoke chinese. and she brought a flyer. it was written in chinese. she really needed assistance. i was able to communicate with them. next time she should bring an interpreter or someone who can help her through the communication process. >> i assume we also provide interpretation if requested in advance? >> don -- would be the person to respond. >> maybe donna can address that after we hear from the applicant. it is very important that we provide interpreters ourselves. >>that has been an issue. >> especially for language involved. >> thank you very much. >>thank you. >>next we have ms. louisa mendoza. >> good afternoon to the panel ladies and gentlemen. my name is louisa mendoza, resident of san francisco for over 25 years. from south america via the caribbean. i am seeking a
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
sorry, the june first day in june, june 2. we have reached an agreement with united educators for a two-year agreement. and both years have one-and-a-half of forced closure days. the half closure day is on the last day of school, noted on may 30. and then june 2 is the professional development day which also is a forced closure for our teachers. that's a furlough day. so we are pleased that in the school year is 179.5 days for the 13-14 year. and again those forced closure days may be revisited in the course based on the district and finances. >> okay. it's very timely as i got an e-mail today from someone asking me when the first day of school was in august. thank you for being so timely. >> thank you, madam president, this it will be the district website tomorrow. >> great, assuming we pass it. roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas,>> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> yes. >> unanimous. >> thank you. next item is -- let's see, informational items. initial proposals. i announce the signing of the following two propo
. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to
, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we improve the economy tha
and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into f
organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions s
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
a potential customer's attention long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to
that was taking away from the value. they need education. when you go through the first process there is a checklist as to what you should be bringing in if you're going to the hearing. >> thank you so much. thank you ms. nelson. next we have shawn ridgell. okay. next we have daniel hershkowitz. >> how do you do? >> how do you do. >> please ask me the same question at the end. i am a real estate attorney and arrested broker in san francisco. i have been here for half of my life, true in a couple of months. i have been a real estate attorney for the last 15 years here san francisco and for a few years in oakland. for the last 12 years i have worked primarily as a real estate broker. i have quite a bit of experience with the appraisal process. i am a homeowner here in san francisco. that is in true; i have been a renter for the last two months; for the previous 15 years, an owner of single-family homes and a few condos and also the landlord. i understand all of those perspectives. i also was the president and secretary depending on the year of homeowners associations; i have been
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
of a public education enrichment fund expenditure plan for the school year, 2013-14, that will be moved to the meeting on the whole. >> you need a motion? i am sorry, yes i do. >> so moved. >> second. >> now it's referred to the committee as a whole on january 15. item r, board members' proposals for first reading none. item s, board members' reports, standing committees. i am sorry, do i do committees first or read it off. standing committees. we have a report from the buildings and ground committee. >> yes, the buildings and ground committee met on december 17th on two informational items. the first was an update on the current technology initiatives in sfsud. and i want to thank matt kensey and his team, we just have been able to advance by leaps and bounds. all of our schools are wired for the internet. there is still some last mile connectivity issues. but i want to acknowledge our previous superintendent, carlos garcia that made sure that was money in the qta dedicated to infrastructure. and some of you know in a previous life i worked in high-tech. and when i came to san francisc
to acknowledge the noe valley merchants' association for their exemplary commitment to education and assist businesss in noe valley on disability access requirements. the noe valley merchants' the association understands that continued disability outreach and education is about maintaining the economic preservation of their merchant corridor and it is the only merchants association in san francisco that has established a standing committee to develop comprehensive outreach -- excuse me. that establishes a standing committee and developed a comprehensive outreach and education program and assist businesses that are in pre-and post-litigation. the small business commission commends the noe valley merchants association as an outstanding merchants association not only for their dedication to the businesss in their districts, but also for being a strong citywide and statewide voice for businesses and individuals with disabilities around the issue of disability access compliance. so thank you. [ applause ] so i just have a few other notes. is that the noe valley merchants association has made th
services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate this very much from the government of san francisco and i thanks our community at large and everyone who is here and for them, i thank them also and we will try our be
, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it shows from my perspective wher
superintendent in nevada. richard's passion lies in advancing educational equity and opportunity for all and we are very lucky to have him here with us here in san francisco. our superintendent of schools, richard karunda >> melinda, thank you so much for that wonderful introduction. i want to welcome you all to a sunny september morning in san francisco, i hope you have your sun block and i also want to welcome home our lieutenant governor, our former mayor, gachb newsom. it's good to see you, sir. yesterday was a really powerful experience for us in san francisco. we've made a commitment that by the end of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documentary but also go through a rich can urriculum from our teachers understanding the lessons from that movie. we all know a movie in and of itself doesn't make a difference, but i will tell you, we didn't start our approach to understanding it with the movie bully. we're very proud 234 san francisco that we have had an approach based on restore
for them to be educated. they want to be educated. we worked out some of the plans for -- because i met with the college trustees and i will be meeting with them again on thursday. there are a lot of promises have been made to the trustees about what puc would do, but nothing has been done. and what i'm here is to talk about -- to see that things get started because school starts next monday. and i've asked one of the trustees to come and speak with you also on public comment. and the other concern that i have, great concern, is that the college itself. the college had 33,000 square feet of space when they opened up in 1986. now, because of some politicking and playing went on, they are down to 17,000 feet, square feet. that college should be all 33,000 square feet for the classes that we had that was given to other colleges. and the programs are coming back. i've talked with of the trustees and they are willing and their sending some of our programs back, and they all are coming back and we want an addition of services in my community because they cannot go outside of the area. so, wha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,149 (some duplicates have been removed)